Independent Clauses | n. —unusual words about underappreciated music

Tramplini-Hallo, Mazie! EP

February 1, 2008

<a href=”http://www.tramplini.lv”>Tramplini</a> – <u>Hallo, Mazie!</u> EP<br><br>Klausule <br><br>Soothing and melodious indie-rock sounds from Latvia in a delightful EP.<br><br>Hailing from Latvia, a small European country that borders the Baltic Sea, comes indie rock band Tramplini. The group formed in 1997, and a year later, released an EP called <u>Planetas</u>. After a break of nearly ten years, the band released their second EP <u>Hallo, Mazie!</u> in 2006. Unsure of what to expect from a Latvian indie band, I was very pleasantly surprised by the ethereal, mellow music in <u>Hallo, Mazie!</u>.<br><br>Despite the fact that the vocalists in Tramplini do not sing in English, <u>Hallo, Mazie!</u> is nonetheless an extremely appealing listen. In fact, the language barrier actually gives the EP a magical feel in combination with the compelling melodies and slow, dreamy tempos. The first track “Pargajiens” (my apologies for not including the accent marks of the Latvian language) is a psychedelic, yet romantic and calming, tune with an unexpected brass interval near the end. The horn parts in this section add a new and different dimension but without ruining the mood or pace previously established in the song.<br><br>The opener transitions into the most rock-influenced song on the EP, “Tas Pats.” But while it is definitely more uptempo, it doesn’t sacrifice the calm ambiance created in the first track. “Tas Pats” maintains continuity with the overarching vocal lines that rise above the harder-rock drones. In “Sovbizness,” the next track, however, serenity is completely restored. The use of little, tinkling bells makes it quite charming, if you weren’t already captivated. <br><br><u>Hallo, Mazie!</u> concludes with the instrumental “Millennia,” which sounds like an indie lullaby, but one that everyone should stay awake for. The bell parts and the keyboards stand out well in this song, and as it slowly fades away at the end, the listener is left with a feeling of great completeness. Overall, although this EP is a mere five songs, it is a great accomplishment from the Latvian Tramplini. I just hope that they don’t wait another ten years to release more music. <u>Hallo, Mazie!</u> is recommended for any fans of Yo La Tengo, Sigur Ros, Sufjan Stevens, or indie rock from obscure European countries.<br><br>Megan Morgan<br><br>

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Stephen Carradini and friends write reviews of bands that are trying to make the next step in their careers.

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