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There is Danger’s Mirror Eyes: Capture a Dream

Last updated on November 20, 2020

The only way to capture a dream is with art. The mediums of music and visual arts have the ability to put substance to the intangible, an unseen substance taking form before one’s eyes. Listeners can take a trip into a dream, into a mirrored existence with There is Danger. Founder Illya Riske (Reindeer Tiger Team, Whisperlights, Phoenix Afrobeat Orchestra), Spike, Stefan, Leah, Chelsey, Daniel, Jake, Kevin, Matt, Bryan, and Marcus create a fluid, poetic experience; a true marriage of music and lyricism that is the definition of dream pop. Mirror Eyes, via Lumberjack Records, delivers an ethereal narrative.

This sixteen-minute and fifty-nine-second neo-psychedelic journey written by There is Danger and Owen Wilson is best experienced with eyes closed, allowing the listener to fully absorb each nuanced reverberation. Attention to sonic quality is the essence of There is Danger. Mirror Eyes is a symphony that takes no form, enveloping the listener in color and beauty. Each movement is a surrealist moment that brings to mind what dreams may come. The instrumentation here is lush, featuring a depth that resonates with exotic beauty and vision. Stepping into a surrealist space with this record is necessary.

The cover art created by Davina Griego captures the essence of the lyrical dream presented here. Each brush stroke of sound is performed by There is Danger, featuring Andy Montufar on trumpet and David Moroney on backing vocals. Mirror Eyes was recorded by Adam Burd at Avast! Recording Company and mixed by Adam Burd at Burhouse.

The essence of There is Danger is an amalgamation of many moving parts coming together in a creation of color painted with notes. The finale of the work ideal: folding in instrumentation that includes horns and heavy percussion, the tune marches towards a final waking moment. The cacophony of sound and chaos that wraps the release is simply a brilliant finale to the dream.–by Lisa Whealy