Independent Clauses | n. —unusual words about underappreciated music

MP3s: Acoustic, pt. 2

September 24, 2015

Acoustic, pt. 2

1. “Say You Won’t Forget” – Lindsey Saunders. Here’s a smoky, sultry, classy-nightclub acoustic ballad that very nearly makes the lights dim of its own accord.

2. “Got You Well” – Gabrielle Papillon. Tense, ominous folk led by Papillon’s alto, thumping percussion, and occasional blasts of distorted guitar.

3. “Iris Lullaby” – Kara Kesselring & Sugarcreek Road. Who can resist a sweet, kind country lullaby?

4. “Love Everyone” – Virginia Sook. Delicate, staccato, homespun folk with an emphasis on the gentle vocals.

5. “Fade Into You” – Brett Borovic. This Mazzy Star cover includes wintry accompanying images, which fits with the stark folk reimagining of the tune.

6. “The Rope” – Bitter’s Kiss. The ability to create drama through a vocal performance without getting bombastic is a rare skill that Chloe Baker possesses.

7. “Reckless With Your Memories” – My Dead Air. A light, airy West Coast vibe permeates this quiet indie-pop tune.

Lindsey Saunders shows off her technical and melodic chops

October 14, 2014

lindseysaunders

Lindsey Saunders‘ four-song EPMiles Before Sleep is a solo acoustic guitar effort that showcases her impressive technical and melodic skill. Saunders’ modus operandi in these tunes is to set up a melodic environment not unlike that of a solo piano piece: an introductory section to establish mood, then development of themes, then variations on those themes–all while managing the crescendo/descrescendo flow of the piece. (It was originally meant to accompany a dance piece by Texture Ballet.)

This wouldn’t work if Saunders weren’t so impressive at fretwork: the flowing opener “Task” leads the listener on a relaxing journey full of melody ideas, while “Decision” amps up the speed of the work and pulls off some complex, syncopated lead lines. “Questioning” opens with the feel of the former but graduates to the latter, featuring some of her most aggressive, acrobatic-sounding fretwork. “Acceptance” returns to the lullaby-esque feel of “Task,” closing the EP on a pensive, beautiful note. I’m only rarely sent acoustic solo guitar work, but so far I’ve enjoyed what I’ve heard. Perhaps only those with intense chops even consider pulling it off. Lindsey Saunders has both the technical skill and the melodic songwriting chops to write impressive and engaging solo guitar tunes, which is rare. The EP drops November 4.

Matthew Oomen / Jesse Marchant

October 6, 2014

matthewoomen

Folk music can sound like any season: spring (The Tallest Man on Earth), summer (Josh Ritter), fall (The Head and the Heart), and winter (Bon Iver). Matthew Oomen is from Norway, and his acoustic-led singer/songwriter tunes definitely take inspiration from the arctic surroundings and lean into the wintry side of things. In contrast to Bon Iver’s impressionistic emoting, the strengths of Oomen’s Where the Valley Is Long lie in spacious arrangements, distinct rhythms, meticulous performances, and crisp production.

“Master’s Row” opens the album with precise, separated acoustic guitar and banjo fingerpicking, stating very quickly what sort of album this will be. Oomen comes in with gentle whispered/sung tenor vocals, then brings in a swooping cello. The overall effect is a romantic, wintry vibe: the space in the arrangements gives room for listeners to breathe, and the gentle mood has wistful, amorous overtones. The song would fit perfectly in a day where you cuddled up with your lover next to a warm fire as snow falls.

The rest of the songs doen’t stray far from that mood, creating a warm, open, resonant album. “Called to Straw” is one of the slowest on the record, leisurely creating a beautiful atmosphere with the banjo, guitar, and dual-gender vocals. “Camp Hill” is an instrumental track that excellently displays the melodic gift that Oomen has. Some may find that the dominant fingerpicking style can result in some difficulty of differentiation between the tunes, but the specific mood of the album is so consistent that it’s just as good to me as a whole unit as in individual bits. Where the Valley is Long is a beautiful, enchanting, comforting album of pristine singer/songwriter folk. Fans of Young Readers, The Tallest Man on Earth, and Joshua Radin’s early work will find much to love here.

jessemarchant

Jesse Marchant‘s self-titled record is far more masterful than a debut would usually be, because Marchant has released several albums under the JBM moniker. (I’m particularly fond of Not Even In July.) Marchant’s first offering under his real name brings his powerful brand of serious music to great results at two different poles. When I first reviewed Marchant’s live show earlier this year, I compared him to a mix of Gregory Alan Isakov and Jason Molina. Here he largely separates those influences, splitting his wistful/romantic and churning/tension-laden elements into different tunes.

I was originally attracted to Marchant’s music for his quiet tunes, but his noisier offerings are just as compelling here. The muscly “In the Sand/Amelia” relies on a seriously fuzzed-out guitar riff and heavy bass tones to create an emotional, powerful tune. He caps the song with a brief yet impressive bit of squalling guitar solo. “All Your Promise” has a bit of Keane-style dramatic flair to its intro, leaning on cinematic, back-alley tenion before settling into a quieter, synth-laden verse. “Adrift” starts off with a big pad synth and a serious drumkit groove; it doesn’t exactly resolve into a rock tune, but it’s pretty close.

But even “In the Sand/Amelia” has an abrupt return to quietness in its middle section. Marchant knows how to wring emotion out of a repetitive guitar riff, a mournful vocal line, and time, and that hasn’t changed here. Opener “Words Underlined” shows him in full form, building a six-minute experience out of a uncomplicated, gently strummed electric guitar. He’s still in Jason Molina territory there. He does turn his attention to less brooding tunes, like the upbeat “The Whip”–not nearing power-pop by any means, but Isakov fans will know the vibe intuitively. “Stay on Your Knees” has a bit more of a rock feel, but the swift fingerpicking pulls it from his Songs:Ohia pole closer to the Isakov one. But even within the song there are dalliances: synths appear, a piano section pops up, etc.

Marchant is building his own style here, and it’s working really well: he’s identifiable with other musicians but not copying them. Jesse Marchant is a satisfying album that should make fans of those not in the know and please those who have followed him as JBM. If you’re into musicians like Leif Vollebekk, Isakov, Molina or Bowerbirds, you’ll find a kindred spirit here.

Quick Hit: Lindsey Saunders

May 19, 2014

nothingnormal

I get way more adult alternative submissions than I cover, which makes it surprising that people keep sending me AA releases. But every now and then, one bubbles up to the top and knocks my socks off. Lindsey SaundersNothing Normal EP is that rare AA release.

Lots of people can sing, and lots of people can write great songs. It’s rarer than you’d think to find people who do both. Saunders’ strong, clear alto fits on top of strong, tense songwriting with easy command. In opener “Change My Mind,” she powers through the chorus with attitude, passion, and control–another set of adjectives that are not often invoked together. Saunders moves from Goo Goo Dolls-style pop to country/soul on “Make or Break Us,” and it’s a neat turn. The chord-based guitar work here is surprisingly tight and complex, resulting in another memorable track. “That Way” shows some intricate finger-style guitar work, revealing yet another facet of her sound. Throughout all of this, Saunders’ strong voice leads the way.

If you’re into strong female singer/songwriters, Lindsey Saunders should be on your watch list. She’s unapologetic about her vocal and instrumental sound, which is a rare quality. There are still moments that lean too heavily on radio-friendly tactics (the chorus of “We’re Never Thru” especially), but Saunders’ songwriting voice is in there, trying to break out. Give it some time, and Saunders could be a really special songwriter.

Stephen Carradini and friends write reviews of bands that are trying to make the next step in their careers.

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