Independent Clauses | n. —unusual words about underappreciated music

Offset Missing Ace

November 28, 2004

Almost More Band Members than Audience!

Offset/Missing Ace

The Pinkeye, Tulsa, OK

Thursday, Nov 4, 2004

I’d never been to the Pinkeye before this show, so I really didn’t know what to expect when I went out to take in a show there. In fact, I got lost on the way, because I was expecting a venue much, much bigger. In reality, it looks like the Pinkeye supports about 50 people. They probably cram a bunch more in there for good shows, but it’s basically a one-room shack with a two story ceiling. While some may scoff, on first glance I thought “excellent for a concert!”

It was good for Offset: their pummeling, raucous melodic emo echoed off the walls of the cramped building like a tornado, and by the time two songs were down, my ears were trashed- ringing like a busted school bell. The stage at the Pinkeye is tiny, like everything else, but the band made the most of it, nearly hitting each other in the face as they flailed their instruments around. The lead singer was kinetic, as he bent, bounced, moved, and pretty much just gave his all to the music. The songs flew by- with the crunchy guitars, empowered vocals, and emphatic drumming, there really wasn’t anything to hold these songs back. The best moment of the show came when the lead singer looped the mic around his neck, ran over to the drums, and started playing a tom roll as the drummer went off on a drum solo. It was seriously sick- complete and total awesomeness. Offset’s stage antics and powerful stage presence make them one of the best emo bands I’ve ever witnessed live.

In some odd turn of fate, the promoter/venue stuck the nationally touring emo band Offset first, then the local pop-punkers Missing Ace last. Maybe it was to keep the crowd there or something- but if definitely wasn’t because Missing Ace was better. Their pop-punk was on the better side of wretched- well-played, energetic, but lacking substance in the worst way. They had technical difficulties throughout the first song, resulting in only half the band playing through it- in one song, the bassist was tuned wrong, resulting in the song collapsing about 20 seconds in- in another, the patch cords on the lead guitar died. I’m not sure how much of that was Missing Ace’s fault, but all of it counted against them in my mind. I went with the ‘three strikes and you’re out’ rule, and so I left when they joyously proclaimed “We’ve got two songs left!”

In the royal mismatch of the century, Offset crushed Missing Ace. The twenty or so people who were there enjoyed Missing Ace more than Offset though- it makes me sad to see that our scene is that degraded. Or maybe it was just the Thursday night.

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Stephen Carradini and friends write reviews of bands that are trying to make the next step in their careers.

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