Independent Clauses | n. —unusual words about underappreciated music

Fun, pleasant release from Baltimore’s The Seldon Plan

July 1, 2009

Looking for some indie pop with lush harmonies and a bright sound? Then you’ve come to the right place. The Beechfields, a record label based in Baltimore, Maryland, released The Seldon Plan’s third full-length album earlier this month.

The Seldon Plan’s Lost and Found and Lost is a showcase of melodies easy for the listener to pick up on and enjoy. The album’s opener, “Caldecott,” has punchy verses that lead up perfectly to the slower (but no less catchy) chorus.

The group consists of four members, two of which both provide vocals and play guitar. What is interesting, though, is that one of these singer/guitarists is Dawn Dineen, and her presence adds a lot to the harmonies. The songs that feature her singing lead vocals, like “Fire in Day’s Field,” “Run, Go!” and “See a Word” add a unique aspect to The Seldon Plan’s indie pop. Dineen also has a lower voice than a lot of female singers, and it is steady and easy to listen to.

The only real weakness of Lost and Found and Lost is that some of the songs (“See a Word”) can get a little repetitive, with choruses that are played over again without making any musical changes a few too many times. But this can easily be forgiven because despite the fact that this can get a little annoying, most of the choruses on this album are gosh-darn catchy.

Some of the standout songs on this album are the title track and “Philadelphia and a Moment.” “Lost and Found and Lost” (which is a very cool name, if you ask me) includes irresistible, snappy hand claps (or percussion that at least sounds like hand claps) and a fun keyboard line. “Philadelphia and a Moment” is a bit of an acoustic ballad that picks up the pace and changes toward the middle. Its unique instrumentation, which includes wind instruments, gives “Philadelphia and a Moment” a full feel that nonetheless seems intimate.

The group describes the album’s themes as a story of “expectant hope and recession blues.” The Seldon Plan’s Lost and Found and Lost is recommended for fans of Death Cab for Cutie and The New Pornographers.

Stephen Carradini and friends write reviews of bands that are trying to make the next step in their careers.

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