Independent Clauses | n. —unusual words about underappreciated music

Brook Pridemore has a new live cassette, and he knows that Jack Kerouac once said, “The only truth is music.”

February 12, 2014

brookpridemore

I think we have a true folk voice here. I had never heard of Brook Pridemore, hailing from Brooklyn, New York. (By the way, the title of the live cassette I’m reviewing here is My Name Is Brook Pridemore, And I Live In Brooklyn, NY). I had the chance to talk with Brook, and I think the answers write this review. After sampling his music, I decided to get to know this artist.

Major influences?
Bill Callahan, Thee Headcoats, Tom Waits, The Mountain Goats…

I can see that Brook gravitates toward very real, natural artists. Brook once got to show Bill “Smog” Callahan his Bill Callahan tattoo! Similarly, Brook writes in a true folk tradition. He writes about the immediate,  foregoing the struggles of song construction and ambiguity that songwriters often labor over. I ask Brook about performing solo with the type of concrete material he has.

“I am not a ‘singer songwriter.’ Brook Pridemore is a band. It happens to have the same name as I do.  It has always been a band, there have just been long patches where I’m the only person playing.  I have learned, through thousands of solo shows, how to perform under any circumstances.  I could go on for days regarding the weird spots I’ve been in.  I got used to running out as soon as the band before me was done, and shout my name and where I was from, and start to play.  Fewer people left, if I did that.  It has still always been a tough slog.  But I wouldn’t trade it for the easier route.”

Brook says his home state of Michigan has nothing to do with his lyrics, but that where he is now does.

“A good bit of my lyrical inspiration comes from years of seeing Kerouac’s America, that is, big wide open spaces, taken through a windshield, the clack-clack of the interstate beneath the wheels, getting stranded atop mountains, making out with strangers, rocking out in Austin after spending the previous night in jail, never giving up, never surrendering, always on the go, always on the run, until you stop and breathe, and realize that the feeling that you’ve been running away from is in your own head.  And you stay home (Brooklyn) for a while, and you learn how to occupy the space you’re in.  So, yes, location matters a lot in my lyrics.”

Bill Callahan says in his song, “Seagull,” “A barroom may entice a seagull like me right off the sea, and into the barroom. How long have I been gone? How long have I been traveling?” I ask Brook if he is married, single, or happily involved. Also, if he meets a lot of hotties because he makes music… or because he’s at bars more than an average person (performing)… or after performing …after a sweaty rave-up (which are what songs like “Chocolate Cake City” and “The Year I Get It Right” from this new live release are: drenched roof-rockers).

“I’m not in a relationship at the moment.  I learned the hard way that I’m not going to meet my wife at a bar. I’m an odd duck. I need to get to know a girl.”

The reviewer interjects. “But, if you’re like (Brook) you run like hell and get to see the world, ‘til you find yourself in Brighton… missing a girl.” -directly from his own song “Oh, E!” – the reviewer’s pick from this release.

I guess we all want to know, then, why did Brook Pridemore start writing songs or, rather, start just putting his reality right on the line… an open book?
“I was drawn to music from an early age.  I was looking for a creative outlet, and I’d missed the boat on marching band. I got my hands on a guitar in 1993, and have never really looked back. Music is so much more immediate than poetry, or fiction, or acting. It’s also so much more personal.” One can pick any song on this live cassette and just know that you’re going to hear a great story, well-told. It’s really an exciting listen also, because you can hear the die-hards in the front rows near the recording device singing along. Brook finishes, “I didn’t realize until I was much older that the big reason for writing songs is so I could make people listen to what I had to say.  And because I wanted to make people dance.”

He gets them dancing around track four of the live cassette (recorded at the Sidewalk Café in Manhattan in 2011), and he only has to suggest it once.

Discover Brook Pridemore. Check out the new live cassette. I hope to see life in the very in-the-present way Brook does. It seems like a great way to exist, experience, and then move forward. -Gary Lee Barrett

Stephen Carradini and friends write reviews of bands that are trying to make the next step in their careers.

Recent Posts

Independent Clauses Monthly E-mail

Get updates and information about IC, plus opportunities for bands.
Band name? PR company? Business?
* = required field

powered by MailChimp!

Archives